How to survive development - by Serge Latouche[Reading report] by Audrey Boulkaid

2011-12-10

The author was part of the “Alternative Management” third year program in HEC in 2011

In this book, Serge Latouche presents us a nuanced and critical vision of development. He addresses the contradictions and paradoxes related to development and economic growth. The author offers us to overcome this contradictions through the possibility of an after-development, that would be based upon degrowth, localism and social ties. According to Latouche, an after development will not be possible if we don't start a new ear of de-growth.

Quote article  Audrey Boulkaid, « How to survive development - by Serge Latouche », 10 december 2011, Alternative Management Observatory (AMO), [Reading report]
http://appli6.hec.fr/amo/Articles/Entry/Item/233.sls

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