Climate Wars - What People Will be Killed for in the 21st Century - by Harald Welzer[Reading report] by Jean-Baptiste Rouphael

2014-02-28

The author is part of the "Alternative Management" third year specialization program in HEC Paris

Climate Wars: What People Will be Killed for in the 21st Century is an essay by German sociologist Herald Welzer published in 2008. The author claims that people have a natural inclination to violence in order to satisfy their needs. Indeed, the current climate change crisis may cause wars whose first victims would be the poorest. The author justifies his views by demonstrating the environmental factors of past and current conflicts. Catastrophic views for some, visionary book for others: Welzer’s essay divides experts and readers interested in global issues

Quote article  Jean-Baptiste Rouphael, « Climate Wars - What People Will be Killed for in the 21st Century - by Harald Welzer », 28 february 2014, Alternative Management Observatory (AMO), [Reading report]
http://appli6.hec.fr/amo/Articles/Entry/Item/326.sls

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