Climate Wars - What People Will be Killed for in the 21st Century - by Harald Welzer[Reading report] by Jean-Baptiste Rouphael

2014-02-28

The author is part of the "Alternative Management" third year specialization program in HEC Paris

Climate Wars: What People Will be Killed for in the 21st Century is an essay by German sociologist Herald Welzer published in 2008. The author claims that people have a natural inclination to violence in order to satisfy their needs. Indeed, the current climate change crisis may cause wars whose first victims would be the poorest. The author justifies his views by demonstrating the environmental factors of past and current conflicts. Catastrophic views for some, visionary book for others: Welzer’s essay divides experts and readers interested in global issues

Quote article  Jean-Baptiste Rouphael, « Climate Wars - What People Will be Killed for in the 21st Century - by Harald Welzer », 28 february 2014, Alternative Management Observatory (AMO), [Reading report]
http://appli6.hec.fr/amo/Articles/Entry/Item/326.sls

In the same section

Scenario “Population ageing and immigration”

[Scenario]

[Scenario] : Tatiana Bekhazi, Nathalie Biren, Anais Denoits, Samia-Mia Kassem, Elodie Payre

Within the framework of the “Scenario” course, we chose to study the economic and social changes entailed by the French population ageing and to draw up a parallel with the evolution of the immigrant influx into France by the year 2050, in the perspective of the Ministry of Economy and Finance....

>>Read more

Why and How we should abandon nuclear power - by Bernard Laponche and Benjamin Dessus

[Reading report]

[Reading report] : Ingrid Colonna

Should we abandon nuclear power ? Bernard Laponche and Benjamin Dessus, two experts of the sector, give a very clear and constructive answer to this question, far from the usual platitudes on the topic.

>>Read more

Towards Happy Moderation - by Pierre Rabhi

[Reading report]

[Reading report] : Laure Cassaigne

This book is the testimony of Pierre Rabhi, farmer and philosopher. In 1960 he chose to to leave the consumer society, which is alienating and dehumanizing. He clearly exposed the weaknesses of our society and invites us to think of a new form of society to change our values, our human...

>>Read more

Transition Town Totnes

[Scenario]

[Scenario] : Marion Coutel

Totnes Ville en Transition belongs to the movement of transition initiatives, that was founded by Rob Hopkins, Professor of permaculture. These initiatives offer solutions to the peak oil and the climatic change, that are two important challenges and upcoming upheavals.

>>Read more

Crops for the future – How agroecology can feed the world – by Marie-Monique Robin

[Reading report]

[Reading report] : Sabrina Gonçalves Krebsbach

Crops for the future is a travel log relating a very optimistic investigation on diverse agro-ecological initiatives throughout the world. Marie-Monique Robin, investigative journalist, shows to what extent agro-ecology can be a solution the today’s food crisis. She denounces the limits of...

>>Read more

With the same doctype

Reading report

The Culture of the New Capitalism - by... The Culture of the new capitalism,... by Elodie Payre
Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and... The book « Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not... by Caroline Charhon
Coming Home to the Pleistocene - by... Paul Shepard is one of the most famous... by Ségolène Guinard
The Wisdom of Crowds - by James... Could a crowd be the best expert on a... by Fleur d'Harcourt
Their big fear - by François Ruffin Object of all passions for several... by François Petitjean
Afterthoughts on Material Civilization... What can economic history teach us... by Camille Portejoie
The Cathedral and the Bazaar - by Eric... This essay by E. S. Raymond is one of... by Marie Mourad
Cold Intimacies: The Making of... In this book, Eva Illouz analyses the... by Céline Peudenier
The Atlas of Migrants in Europe... This atlas draws a critical balance... by Marion Coutel
Energy Transition - The German... Germany has set itself ambitious goals... by Elie Simon