The pleasures and sorrows of work - by Alain de Botton[Reading report] by Nicolas Trimoulet

2012-11-30

The author was part of the "Alternative Management" third year program in HEC in 2012. Nicolas Trimoulet is a former student of the French Ecole Normale Supérieure and holds a degree in law and an "agrégation" in economics and management.

We are all supposed to love our jobs. It would give us a sense of control over our lives as well as an identity to others. It would not be a punishment anymore. Alain de Botton, throughout the visit of ten workplaces over the world (from a biscuit plant in Belgium to the Bourget fair through a satellite launching in French Guyana), explores these premises and wonder if we all find a meaning to our lives thanks to our jobs. Dominating our everyday lives, is work ever, rarely, sometimes or always corresponding to our expectations?

Quote article  Nicolas Trimoulet, « The pleasures and sorrows of work - by Alain de Botton », 30 november 2012, Alternative Management Observatory (AMO), [Reading report]
http://appli6.hec.fr/amo/Articles/Entry/Item/280.sls

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