Tools for conviviality - by Ivan Illich[Reading report] by Marie-Chanel Gillier et Elodie Parre

2007-12-12

The authors were part of the "Alternative Management" third year program in HEC Paris in 2006/2007.

Tools for conviviality is an essay of Ivan Illich, published in 1973 in New York, which aims to develop a moral critique of the industrial society. Illich describes the evolution of our Western society as "self-destructive" and senseless, and where the capitalism's tools only justify by and for themselves. Mankind thus becomes the slave of those tools. Illich suggests tracks towards other possibilities which entail, according to him, a turning back to convivial tools, which he opposes to machines. So the establishment of a convivial "joyful austerity" society should follow the crisis of the industrial society.

Quote article  Marie-Chanel Gillier et Elodie Parre, « Tools for conviviality - by Ivan Illich », 12 december 2007, Alternative Management Observatory (AMO), [Reading report]
http://appli6.hec.fr/amo/Articles/Entry/Item/21.sls

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