Wall Street from Oliver Stone (1987): a fable about contemporary world[Article] by Mathilde Denoits

2007-12-12

The author was part of the "Alternative Management" third year program in HEC Paris in 2007/2008

This article tries to address some of the ethical issues raised by the topic of the film, namely the practice of finance in Wall street when the enthusiasm of stock-exchange euphoria increases: the issue of insider trading, the issue of the social responsibility of the financiers, the issue of a "work which doesn't produce anything" according to the hero's father. Oliver Stone gets us to look at the finance's world; this world whose device could be "Greed is good", where moral seems to have disappeared, showing us with a lucid and critical eye not only the human relations' peril but also and above all, a large dehumanization process at work. The director invites us, through a fable about the world of finance, to consider our society as a whole in the relations that it generates but also in the environment that it produces.

Quote article  Mathilde Denoits, « Wall Street from Oliver Stone (1987): a fable about contemporary world », 12 december 2007, Alternative Management Observatory (AMO), [Article]
http://appli6.hec.fr/amo/Articles/Entry/Item/29.sls

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