What’s mine is yours - How collaborative consumption is changing the way we live - by Rachel Botsman et Roo Rogers[Reading report] by Julien Bicrel

2012-05-11

The author was part of the “Alternative Management” third year program in HEC in 2012. Julien Bicrel also graduated from the Rennes Institute of Political Studies, and was admissible to the ENA - French elite public service school. He also worked in the private sector, as a consultant in local public services, for Deloitte, and as a project manager for insertion and social business at Bouygues-Habitat Social. He is interested in research upon collaborative economy and co-working.

What’s mine is yours is the first reference work on collaborative consumption, a movement that proposes nothing less than a socially enriched economy, new activities (such as car-pooling, coworking, cohousing…) and new business models. Using a number of examples, the authors show that collaborative consumption is more than a marketing trend: it is a force for change with a real impact in terms of sustainable development and a mean to build stronger communities.

Quote article  Julien Bicrel, « What’s mine is yours - How collaborative consumption is changing the way we live - by Rachel Botsman et Roo Rogers », 11 may 2012, Alternative Management Observatory (AMO), [Reading report]
http://appli6.hec.fr/amo/Articles/Entry/Item/241.sls

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